Olive Oil & Wine

Olive Oil & Wine

Our products Extra Virgin Organic Olive Oil and Wine have a lot in common when we think about taste, variety and history. Both date back to ancient times and have the option to add more excitement to a meal or dinner, making them both a popular pantry for everyday cooking and relaxation. Although both are fruit juices, the similarities don’t end there. Olive oil and wine have many aspects in common, not only in how they are grown, but also in how they are evaluated. Similarities are found in the cultivation, harvesting, crushing, bottling and testing of the purity and quality of olives and grapes. Fine olive oil is a product of many countries around the world, including Slovenia, but few are of high quality. We often find that grape vines and olive trees grow together in vineyards, as both need a similar climate. Olives act as a protection for the vine and protect them from strong winds, both of which are self-pollinating and do not rely on the help of insects or birds to pollinate the flowers. The grapes usually ripen first, often between August and September; some varieties ripen later, in October and November. When we pick the late-flowering ones, the olives are ready in a row, which means that the pressing of the olives can start after the work of pressing the wine is finished. The most successful in a warm and dry environment, grapes and olives are harvested one after the other, which helps growers to work persistently for a long time. Olives and wine are tested with similar terminology; aroma, taste, appearance. Two tests are required to evaluate olive oil as extra virgin. These are: taste testing and chemical analysis by a certified laboratory (free fatty acid, for example, indicates fruit quality). Similar to wine sommelier, olive oil sommelier also analyzes olive oil based on their aromas and flavors. Although the testing of olive oil is very similar to the testing of wines, it uses the following characteristics to classify high-quality extra virgin olive oils: fruitiness, bitterness, sharpness, balance. In addition to the various similarities of the trials, olive oil and wine have their good and bad years, which depend heavily on the weather. For example, although not preferred, grapes tend to tolerate moisture better than olives, so the olive season can suffer if the season is particularly wet, resulting in lower quality olive oil. Any dramatic climate change can directly affect the taste of grapes, making the ideal climate essential for the taste and quality of wine and olive oil.